Persons: 4     Cost: $$$$     Level: medium     Time: 1.5h      Ingredients: easy to find


The Polish Royal Broth (Rosół Królewski) recipe that I’m sharing with you today has quite a special place in my heart. First off, it has been passed down to me from my mother. Secondly, this dish always reminds me of sitting in my mum’s kitchen, enjoying all the amazing aromas, tasting the ingredients and of course (the best) watching my mum cook. Let’s be honest, the best parties always happen in the kitchen 😉

Before going into the details of this recipe, I would like to bring you back in time, to discover the stories and history of this dish. Rosół is one of the oldest soups, and its simplicity and delicious, almost magical flavor earned it a spot in Polish royal salons and as one of Poland’s national dishes.

This dish came to be when cooks in ancient times slow-cooked meat- which at the time was preserved by salting and drying – in water. It was first called rozsół and later evolved over time, resulting in the name it still holds to this day: Rosół.

The charm of this modest soup comes from the ingredients- which create an infusion of savory meat and vegetables flavors. I often find that the simplest dishes tend to be the most varied- which is the case with this one. Through culinary evolution, we have developed two basic versions of the broth: meat-based and vegetarian; the most common is the meaty one, which has two variations: 1) Today you will discover the Royal, featuring a minimum of two types of meat, 2) The second, more simple version incorporates only one type of meat (usually chicken)  The vegetarian version, is mostly used as a base. I use it for many types of soups, such as cabbage or tomato soups, when I don’t want the flavor of the star vegetable to be overpowered with a meaty broth.

Rosół is generally served with a thin pasta in Polish cuisine; however, in my home my mum always served this soup with “lane kluski”- a type of homemade noodle, which is simple, easy to make and delicious 🙂

Before going into the step #what you need, I’ll let you in on a little Polish secret. Rosół has long been celebrated for its healing qualities thanks to its ingredients. For generations, the soup has been served when someone catches a cold, to boost the immune system. And to be honest, I still make this recipe when I’m feeling under the weather at my home in Paris. It’s my secret Polish medicine;)

I hope you got hungry, let’s start cooking!

# What you need

Polish Royal Broth (meet version)

  • 2l of cold water
  • 1 chicken drumstick/leg
  • 3 slices of Oxtail or other part of beef (350-400g)
  • 1 stalk celery
  • ¼ celeriac
  • 1 orange carrot
  • 1 leek
  • ⅛ cauliflower
  • ¼ small cabbage
  • 4-5 fresh black peppers
  • 5 jamaican peppers
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 yellow onion
  • Salt
  • Dill for decoration

Vegetarian version of Broth

  • 2l of cold water
  • 1 stalk celery
  • ¼ celeriac
  • 1 orange carrot
  • 1 leek
  • ⅛ cauliflower
  • ¼ small cabbage
  • 4-5 fresh black peppers
  • 5 jamaican peppers
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 parsnip
  • 1 yellow onion
  • Salt
  • Dill for decoration

*For the vegetarian version, follow the same steps as in the Royal recipe, minus the meat. Total cook time will take around 1h instead of 1.5h 🙂

Lane Kluski – Polish homemade noodles

  • 1 egg
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • Water
  • Pinch of Salt

#step 1

Take a big pot and fill in with 2.5l of cold water. Next gently wash chicken drumstick -take off any remaining feathers – and oxtail. In my opinion the Royal broth is best with Oxtails as it has a very rich flavor, and ample fat. Put both into a pot with the cold water, and cook for around 20 min on medium-high heat (if you have induction I cook around 7.5)

 

#step 2

After 20 minutes, you should be able to see the fatty parts of the meat on the surface of the soup. Take a tablespoon and skim off, and then reduce heat (on induction I usually drop to 5)

Next prepare the vegetables. First clean them well then peel the celeriac, carrots and parsnip. Cut the bottom portion of the leek and slice into 2 or 3 parts. Cut the bottom part of the onion but do not remove the skin – this gives the broth an intense golden color. Add prepared vegetables to the broth, add remaining vegetables and spices and cook slowly while covered for around 1h. After 20 min season with salt, quite heavily.

 

#step 3

After 1h of slow cooking, your home will be filled with the scent of rosół. I love this aroma, especially during my lazy sundays 🙂 Ok let’s get back to the recipe. By now our soup should be quite ready, you can taste to check if it is seasoned enough. If not just add a bit more and cook another 5min.

Next we need to pass our rosół through a strainer. If you do not have one then simply remove all the ingredients from the broth and cook over very low heat (2 on an induction stove) for around 10min.

 

#step 4

Time to make our Lane Kluski (homemade noodles) Take a medium sized bowl and put around 4 tablespoons of flour, then make a small hole in the middle and add the egg. Sprinkle with salt and start to slowly stir everything with a fork. Then gradually add water and begin to form a unified mass. But be careful not to make the dough too liquid. The best way to check if you have the right consistency is to press the fork into the dough and see how quickly it flows through. If you see a slight resistance it means that it is good.

 

#step 5

Take the bowl of prepared noodles, and use a small spoon or fork to check if soup is hot and stir the broth. Then slowly start to drop our pasta into the soup. Small tip: be careful do not put too much noodles to the soup.

After our lane kluski are all in the soup, cook for another 2 min, after this time is ready to serve! 🙂

I always add some meat for ex. chicken and a bit of carrot into my bowl and then sprinkle with dill to put some color into my dish. And voila! I hope it wasn’t too hard and your delicious Rosol Royal was a success 🙂


*If I have some left overs, I simply ladle the broth into small round molds, and freeze. This way if I want to make another soup then it takes half the time 🙂


The dish can stand in the fridge around 1 day


Accessories used in the photos⇒ 

Bowl: Hakuji, Muji, http://www.muji.eu/pages/online.asp?Sec=11&Sub=97

Marble chopping board: Le BHV (Paris), http://www.bhv.fr

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